Perspectives:Practitioners Speak

Provide hope and purpose: Focus on the good for all!

Provide hope and purpose: Focus on the good for all!

by Erik Peper and Derek Doyle “Fear stops action; hope initiate action.” -Tali Sharot, PhD., author of Influential mind Observe how you feel after you read the following two news reports: Report 1. The graduating class at Atlanta’s historically black Morehouse College got the surprise of a lifetime on Sunday...
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Stress

Stress

By Ruchi Puri, MD, Msc, FACOG

Escaping STRESS is like trying to escape death and taxes. Bottom line: No one escapes stress in life. Stress is an inevitability. What I find interesting is how little we address it despite Google’s 1.32 Billion search results.

The questions I kick around are: What happens in me when I have it? Why is it different for each of us? Does it happen to me or do I do it to myself? What do I do about it? To be honest, my list of questions is much longer but this is a stressful enough start.

Stress is a big deal because there comes a point...

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Therapy with Latinx DACA Clients and Their Families: A Therapist’s Primer

Therapy with Latinx DACA Clients and Their Families: A Therapist’s Primer

by Jason Linder, LMFT A DACA Primer Many therapists are unfamiliar with the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and have little experience serving clients and families with DACA status. I lived in Mexico City for almost 3 years, earned my Master of Arts degree there, speak Spanish, and have worked with many immigrant families...
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The Disability You Don’t Have

The Disability You Don’t Have

by Kevin R. Stone, MD I have never met a paraplegic person who did not, at some point, mention how lucky they were not to be a quadriplegic. And I have often met quadriplegic people who are grateful to still be alive and able to enjoy their families and their work. We have all met injured people who, despite their disabilities, astound us with their optimism and good humor.
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The Psycho-Physiology of Relationships

The Psycho-Physiology of Relationships

by Jason N. Linder, LMFT

As a relationally-oriented therapist I know that relationship distress is the main reason that people seek psychotherapy. Our brains are hardwired with social circuitry that privilege emotions and our fundamental need for close attachments with others. They are imprinted in our survival code. We are innately interdependent...

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Lowriding: Ancestral Healing and Political Resistance

Lowriding: Ancestral Healing and Political Resistance

by Jason N. Linder, LMFT

As a relationally-oriented therapist I know that relationship distress is the main reason that people seek psychotherapy. Our brains are hardwired with social circuitry that privilege emotions and our fundamental need for close attachments with others. They are imprinted in our survival code. We are innately interdependent...

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On Healing the Healer

On Healing the Healer

by David Escobar, MA, PhD (Candidate)

Four years ago, I moved from the outer Mission district of San Francisco, to the lush, green wine country of Northern California. In short order, I acquired a 1952 Chrysler from a local surfer moving to Florida to “catch the waves man!” I purchased the “bomb” (as this type of car is commonly known amongst lowriders) dirt cheap. I just couldn’t pass it up...

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WELLNESS:  From Movement to Profession

WELLNESS: From Movement to Profession

by George Bertelstein

Now, Halloween, 2017…
In a phone call from my primary physician, I received the diagnosis of lung cancer, diagnosed through a CT Scan a few days prior. A multi-year bout of fatigue and inexplicable symptoms with unknowable causes was at last a real thing. It could be seen, assessed, treated and healed. My wife was in the room with me when my doctor called. Speakerphone…

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Mindful Movement for Self-Regulation, Health, and Wellness

Mindful Movement for Self-Regulation, Health, and Wellness

Bigger than ever, with a place for you to engage. by Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, CWP

For over half a century, the concept of wellness has infiltrated communities, schools, workplaces and health care throughout the U.S. and abroad, inspiring people to embrace healthier lifestyles. Wellness has been a movement, profession, and industry, but most of all, wellness continues to evolve as a dynamic process that has now inspired four generations. While wellness as a concept is often criticized as a soft science with insufficient data or questionable ROI, the irony is…

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The Correlation Between Smoking Eradication and the Rise of Obesity

The Correlation Between Smoking Eradication and the Rise of Obesity

by Larry Cammarata, Ph.D.

Somewhere on the path of being a clinical psychologist who is also a Tai Chi instructor, these two seemingly disconnected roles intersected. I began to see the limitations of purely cognitive and mindfulness-based interventions that did not directly integrate the wisdom and resourcefulness of the body into treatment. And this was a two-way street; without an awareness of my body (e.g., posture, eye contact, vocal tone) in the consultation room…

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Perfection of Patience

Perfection of Patience

by Paul R. Perchonock, MD It’s 1970, and I am training to become a doctor. I had just spent four years in North Philadelphia as a medical student and six weeks of 1969 in San Francisco at St Mary's Hospital, across Stanyan from Golden Gate Park. I'd finish rolling plaster on a broken arm in my orthopedic clerkship, then I’d roll a joint, head for Hippie Hill, rage against Nixon and…
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Creativity: The Missing Lesson

Creativity: The Missing Lesson

By Lydia Akhzar, LAc In Buddhist philosophy, patience is considered one of the Ten Perfections; a virtue when practiced diligently, will lead to a perfect way of being. The key to understanding this achievement is the word practice. Allowing oneself the time to exercise the ability to be patient with ourselves and the world around us takes effort and time — not for the weak willed or complacent...
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Why I Teach Yoga in San Quentin

Why I Teach Yoga in San Quentin

by Larry Cammarata, Ph.D.

Somewhere on the path of being a clinical psychologist who is also a Tai Chi instructor, these two seemingly disconnected roles intersected. I began to see the limitations of purely cognitive and mindfulness-based interventions that did not directly integrate the wisdom and resourcefulness of the body into treatment. And this was a two-way street; without an awareness of my body (e.g., posture, eye contact, vocal tone) in the consultation room…

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January: Why It’s Not the Time for a New Year’s Resolution

January: Why It’s Not the Time for a New Year’s Resolution

By Chanda Williams Yesterday I was locked up in San Quentin. It wasn't permanent. I was there teaching yoga. I heard the alarm sound about fifteen minutes into the start of our yoga practice. I asked the men if there was anything we needed to do and they told me that as long as we were in the room, we were ok. It's not unusual for the alarm to go off. It has happened while I taught there before...
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Subversive Cultural Narratives: An Approach to Healing

Subversive Cultural Narratives: An Approach to Healing

By Nicole Bianchi, N.C. It would not be January if we all did not get the invitation to reinvent ourselves. According to popular media, the new year means a new you and a new me. I am tempted to grab a pencil and make a list of all the changes I want to make: I should start getting up earlier, doing yoga daily, giving my kids more variety in their lunches, saying “no” more often, and on and on...
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My Sister’s Cancer Might Have Been Diagnosed Sooner — If Doctors Could Have Seen Beyond Her Weight

My Sister’s Cancer Might Have Been Diagnosed Sooner — If Doctors Could Have Seen Beyond Her Weight

By Benjamin R. Tong, PhD Back in the late 1980s, I saw in psychotherapy a 39-year old Taiwan-born woman; a “very Americanized” high level business professional, who complained of an emotionally and verbally abusive husband, also a Taiwan-born professional in the world of high finance. She wanted to divorce him but was clearly conflicted. Both extended families back home in Taiwan were pressuring her to tough it out, lest a ‘failed’ marriage cause ‘loss of face’ to significant kin.  This would invite great shame from others...
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The most important relationship is with your Self

The most important relationship is with your Self

by Jason N. Linder, LMFT

As a relationally-oriented therapist I know that relationship distress is the main reason that people seek psychotherapy. Our brains are hardwired with social circuitry that privilege emotions and our fundamental need for close attachments with others. They are imprinted in our survival code. We are innately interdependent...

read more
Death of a Healer

Death of a Healer

by David Escobar, MA, PhD (Candidate)

Four years ago, I moved from the outer Mission district of San Francisco, to the lush, green wine country of Northern California. In short order, I acquired a 1952 Chrysler from a local surfer moving to Florida to “catch the waves man!” I purchased the “bomb” (as this type of car is commonly known amongst lowriders) dirt cheap. I just couldn’t pass it up...

read more
Self-care for Trauma and Shock

Self-care for Trauma and Shock

by Kevin R. Stone, MD I have never met a paraplegic person who did not, at some point, mention how lucky they were not to be a quadriplegic. And I have often met quadriplegic people who are grateful to still be alive and able to enjoy their families and their work. We have all met injured people who, despite their disabilities, astound us with their optimism and good humor.
read more
Are You Allergic? Common Allergy Symptoms and Triggers

Are You Allergic? Common Allergy Symptoms and Triggers

By Ruchi Puri, MD, Msc, FACOG

Escaping STRESS is like trying to escape death and taxes. Bottom line: No one escapes stress in life. Stress is an inevitability. What I find interesting is how little we address it despite Google’s 1.32 Billion search results.

The questions I kick around are: What happens in me when I have it? Why is it different for each of us? Does it happen to me or do I do it to myself? What do I do about it? To be honest, my list of questions is much longer but this is a stressful enough start.

Stress is a big deal because there comes a point...

read more
Levels of Healing, Part One: Physico-Chemical Dimensions

Levels of Healing, Part One: Physico-Chemical Dimensions

by Paul R. Perchonock, MD It’s 1970, and I am training to become a doctor. I had just spent four years in North Philadelphia as a medical student and six weeks of 1969 in San Francisco at St Mary's Hospital, across Stanyan from Golden Gate Park. I'd finish rolling plaster on a broken arm in my orthopedic clerkship, then I’d roll a joint, head for Hippie Hill, rage against Nixon and…
read more
Levels of Healing, Part Two: Psycho-Energetic Dimensions

Levels of Healing, Part Two: Psycho-Energetic Dimensions

by David Escobar, MA, PhD (Candidate)

Four years ago, I moved from the outer Mission district of San Francisco, to the lush, green wine country of Northern California. In short order, I acquired a 1952 Chrysler from a local surfer moving to Florida to “catch the waves man!” I purchased the “bomb” (as this type of car is commonly known amongst lowriders) dirt cheap. I just couldn’t pass it up...

read more
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