Perspectives:Practitioners Speak

Creativity: The Missing Lesson

Creativity: The Missing Lesson

By Dr. Kevin R. Stone

Physician education today focuses on the “human” side of medicine: kindness, generosity, and ethical behavior.
When patients are asked what they like most about their doctors, they often mention that “He or she listens to me,” “Answers my questions,” or “Is kind.” At a recent “white coat” ceremony, where new medical students receive their first white coats as a symbol of entry into the profession, each presenter spoke of infusing their training journey with humanism…

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Why I Teach Yoga in San Quentin

Why I Teach Yoga in San Quentin

By Chanda Williams

Yesterday I was locked up in San Quentin.
It wasn’t permanent. I was there teaching yoga.
I heard the alarm sound about fifteen minutes into the start of our yoga practice. I asked the men if there was anything we needed to do and they told me that as long as we were in the room, we were ok. It’s not unusual for the alarm to go off. It has happened while I taught there before…

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January: Why It’s Not the Time for a New Year’s Resolution

January: Why It’s Not the Time for a New Year’s Resolution

By Nicole Bianchi, N.C.

It would not be January if we all did not get the invitation to reinvent ourselves. According to popular media, the new year means a new you and a new me. I am tempted to grab a pencil and make a list of all the changes I want to make: I should start getting up earlier, doing yoga daily, giving my kids more variety in their lunches, saying “no” more often, and on and on…

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Subversive Cultural Narratives: An Approach to Healing

Subversive Cultural Narratives: An Approach to Healing

By Benjamin R. Tong, PhD

Back in the late 1980s, I saw in psychotherapy a 39-year old Taiwan-born woman; a “very Americanized” high level business professional, who complained of an emotionally and verbally abusive husband, also a Taiwan-born professional in the world of high finance. She wanted to divorce him but was clearly conflicted. Both extended families back home in Taiwan were pressuring her to tough it out, lest a ‘failed’ marriage cause ‘loss of face’ to significant kin.  This would invite great shame from others…

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My Sister’s Cancer Might Have Been Diagnosed Sooner — If Doctors Could Have Seen Beyond Her Weight

My Sister’s Cancer Might Have Been Diagnosed Sooner — If Doctors Could Have Seen Beyond Her Weight

By Laura Fraser

My older sister, Jan, visited me in San Francisco last spring. “You look great,” I told her, noticing that her clothes were hanging loose; she’d been heavy most of her life. “I’ve lost 60 pounds,” she said, and I automatically congratulated her. “I wasn’t trying,” she replied. It hit me then that something was very wrong, first with her health, but also with the way I assumed that her weight loss was a sign of well-being…

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The most important relationship is with your Self

The most important relationship is with your Self

by Daniel Linder, M.F.T.

I have been a practicing therapist (MFT) since 1981. When I am asked about my clinical orientation or my primary influences or leanings, I sum it all up in one statement, “I am a self and relationship based therapist; an Addiction Specialist and Relationship Trainer.” I attribute my 30 plus years of experience working with addiction, recovery and relationship related issues to who I am, what I’m most passionate about and to what I’ve always been most passionate about—the inner workings of relationships…

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Death of a Healer

Death of a Healer

By Steven Heller, D.C.

I came to chiropractic from yoga. As a practitioner of Hatha Yoga and a follower of the teachings of an enlightened master, I saw chiropractic health care as perfectly aligned with my spiritual path. I embraced the chiropractic “Big Idea” that the body was a perfectly created, self-healing mechanism that needed neither drugs nor surgery to manifest its perfection. My role as “doctor” was primarily to identify the obstacles to my patients’ expression of health, whether wrong lifestyle, wrong diet, etc. and offer possible solutions towards eliminating the obstacles and allowing the body to heal itself. Thirty five years later, this remains my mantra. I’ve long abandoned the concept of being a “healer”…

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Self-care for Trauma and Shock

Self-care for Trauma and Shock

By Denise Cicuto, L. Ac.

In the past week in the United States we’ve been bombarded with news of a sexual assault offender in Palo Alto, California who was sentenced to only six months for his crime. (The victim’s impact statement was read aloud by members of Congress just last night.) On Sunday June 12th, we awoke to news about the worst hate crime in the history of the LGBTQIA+ community in the United States, that happened at a queer nightclub in Orlando, Florida. News stories affect people in different ways. Shock, anger, grief, fear, worry are some of the emotions we may experience. How do we take care of ourselves during times like this? How can Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine help?…

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Are You Allergic? Common Allergy Symptoms and Triggers

Are You Allergic? Common Allergy Symptoms and Triggers

By Payal Bhandari, M.D.

Whether you suffer from seasonal allergies or year-round allergy symptoms, allergies can take a real toll on your body, and get in the way of everyday quality living. Allergies affect an estimated 50 million people in the United States. The rate has been increasing every year. In fact, allergies are the fifth leading cause of chronic illness in the U.S. for people of all ages. It is also the third most common chronic illness in children under 18 years old. Is it a cold or allergies? If you’ve been sneezing and suffering from a runny nose, coughing, or congestion, your first thought might be that you have a cold. However…

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Levels of Healing, Part One: Physico-Chemical Dimensions

Levels of Healing, Part One: Physico-Chemical Dimensions

By Ricky Fishman, DC

Most people come to see me because they have pain: neck pain, lower back pain, head pain. And they want relief. I first take a history. How long have they had the complaint? What makes the pain worse?  What relieves it? Have they had any car accidents or sports injuries?  What kind of work do they do?  Do they exercise? And so on. Then I do a physical exam. I look at their posture.  How do they hold themselves in space?  Are their heads tipped forward?  Are their shoulders rounded? …

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ricky@rickyfishman.com www.rickyfishman.com
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